A Fan of the Game

Sports Talk, Straight Talk

Inside the Shark Cage, Vol. 59

Quite the Jesus-Greiss-saves game for the Sharks as they defeated the St. Louis Blues, 4-2. Greiss was the man with the plan stopping 35 shots en route to the victory.

Greiss’ patented flailing was toned down tonight — perhaps a good sign — and he looked comfortable in net. That could be for Team Germany’s scouts looking to solidify their starting goaltender for the Olympics. Whatever it is, I hope it continues. Greiss will probably get one or two more starts these next five games to give Evgeni Nabokov extra rest.

The Blues weren’t joking around tonight. They were getting shots through, putting lots of traffic in front of the net, throwing their weight around and skating fast. Those things made it extra tough on the Sharks depleted defense who were once again without Dan Boyle and Marc-Edouard Vlasic.

So much for Boyle ever being day-to-day. I remember the good ole days where he was only supposed to miss one game. What a sham!

As for the Sharks skaters tonight, they were OK. Patrick Marleau scored 21 seconds into the game after a feed from Joe Thornton.

Ryane Clowe increased the lead to two goals seven minutes later, and it was another early two-goal lead. The Blues rallied two minutes after Clowe’s goal. At that point, I’m thinking, “Here we go again. Just like last game against Detroit.” Those thoughts almost came to fruition several times. The Blues controlled the play and dominated for a good twenty minutes.

D.J., if you skate by me, prepare for urination. Just sayin'. (From SJSHARKS.com)

That brings us to halfway through the second period. The Blues were outshooting the Sharks 8-2 the first half of the second period. San Jose slowly started to get their feet under them. The legs started churning, the pucks started getting deep and whaddaya know? A goal comes about. Devin Setoguchi scored on the power play, swinging the momentum back to the Sharks.

Fortunately, the Sharks withstood a Blues comeback in the third. Scott Nichol sealed the deal with a slapshot.

I guess I should have kept the expectations a bit lower since this was the first game of a long road trip. The Blues have been a mosquito to the Sharks, so I’ll give them dap for swatting them.

Niclas Wallin

The Sharks rumor mill is churning with rumors of Niclas Wallin coming to San Jose within the next 24 hours. What the deal could be has varied. I’ve seen Wallin or a second round pick. I’ve seen Wallin for Jody Shelley and Derek Joslin. Apparently Carolina is gaga over Joslin. Maybe the Canes enjoy public urination and see Joslin as a centerpiece for that fetish. Who knows, but I hope the Sharks don’t give up too much. If they do, Ray Whitney better come over too.

Not Everyone is Like You

So I was visiting ChompBoard.com — a Sharks forum, and saw one of the members said:

“its the bull**** bandwagon fans that dont understand that this is a long ass season and losing 1 or 2 games a month doesn’t mean its the end of the friggin world.. it just shows that the team makes mistakes and there are still plenty of things the team needs to work on before the post season..”

Cool story, bro. Guess what? Not everyone thinks the way you do. I’m sorry, but I’m not just going to sit around and have no emotion for these regular season games. What’s the point in being a fan if you’re just going to go through the regular season indifferent to results? Who is the real bandwagon fan here when you’re waiting for April to roll around to really feel these panicky emotions? Ponder that.

I’m a sports fan; I’m a hockey fan; I’m a Sharks fan. If my team blows a game badly, I’m going to be uncomfortable with it. I want to see fixes as soon as possible. I’ve mentioned it before, but I’m impatient. Woe is me for being that way.

You can embrace your “it’s a long season” mentality. That’s fine. A lot of people do. But don’t go around ridiculing other people because they are a different type of person. It’s ridiculous. Yea, what I just said was probably hypocritical, but oh well. I’m on a roll.

Other Notes

Hit-O-Meter: SJ 17  StL 27; Setoguchi and Joe Pavelski both led with three.

The Sharks travel to Nashville, Saturday, for a bout with the Predators.

–Ray

February 5, 2010 Posted by | Hockey | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

We Will Never Forget… (A 9/11 Remembrance)

At 8:42 a.m., September 11th, 2001, time stopped.

Everyone remembers where they were when they heard the unbelievable news, seven years ago today.

The United States government, the sporting world, the stock market, and everything else that occurs on a normal day in America, came to a screeching halt. There was a lack of knowledge about exactly what had happened or how it had happened, but there a few things that every American knew:

We were NOT going to lay down in the face of fear.

We would find the culprits and capture everyone who was involved.

We would stand up next to each other, because we are the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Just like everyone else in the world, the sporting world was just as affected by the terrorist attacks. Any games that were supposed to be played were postponed, while the world sat in horror not knowing what was going to happen next. The Major League Baseball season was halted for a week – not because the players couldn’t play – but because no one knew what was safe. So while safety rules were implemented, players went home to be with their families and friends. A week later, the players came back rested, and ready to represent America in only ways athletes could.

The sporting world represents America year around and all over the the world. 6 days after the attacks, American’s knew they had to get back to a state of normalcy and the way they did that was by watching the sports and entertainment world. God Bless America and the United States National Anthem played throughout America at all sporting events after that horrific day. Firefighters and police officers helped spread out American flags across baseball diamonds and other sporting venues. The New York Mets and Yankees, or Yankees and Mets if you are a Yankees fan, along with some other athletes from across the United States, showed faith and gratitude to those who lost their lives, emergency personnel that showed up at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and the landing field of United 93, by sponsoring apparel that were given to the players. The most popular 4 letter acronym following the attacks, without a doubt, had to be NYPD. We, as Americans, owe the NYPD and NYFD for all their courage, because without them, who knows how many more lives could have been lost.

The late Jack Buck addressed the fans in St. Louis before the first game started after the attacks. Standing in front of a capacity crowd of Red, White, and Blue, he pulled out a piece of paper and began to read:

“Since this nation was founded … under God

More than 200 years ago

We have been the bastion of freedom

The light that keeps the free world aglow

We do not covet the possessions of others

We are blessed with the bounty we share.

We have rushed to help other nations

… anything … anytime … anywhere.

War is just not our nature

We won’t start … but we will end the fight

If we are involved we shall be resolved

To protect what we know is right.

We have been challenged by a cowardly foe

Who strikes and then hides from our view.

With one voice we say, “There is no choice today,

There is only one thing to do.

Everyone is saying — the same thing — and praying

That we end these senseless moments we are living.

As our fathers did before … we shall win this unwanted war

And our children … will enjoy the future … we’ll be giving.”

Mr. Buck did not make it through the entire poem without shedding tears, but from the view of the MLB, that was the defining moment. It was the first time since the events that someone, other than the government, had come out and made a speech about the events. Mr. Buck had made the speech that had convinced Americans worldwide who had tuned into the game, that we would be OK and that we would never forget.

Lee Greenwood puts it best in his song “God Bless the USA” when he says:

“And I won’t forget the men who died who gave that right to me, And I gladly stand up next to you and defend her still today.”

We as American’s need not to forget those who gave up their lives to save others, and to save us on that horrific day, seven years ago.

And to all those firefighters and police officers who continue to protect us everyday, thank you.

-Nathan


September 11, 2008 Posted by | Baseball, Other | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment